imagine and create


ideas, creations, artistic inspiration. Celebrating creative people,their inspirations, and stories. Including my own.

Ask me anything
stretching!  Taken from underneath

stretching!  Taken from underneath

Tagged: catsblack catsfunny cats

Beautiful

Beautiful

Source: yodewandadawan

Tagged: sunriseskylandscapephotographysunrise photo

We are all compromisers. Did you tweet vicious language about MakerBot from your iPhone or iPad? Are you reading this on a Dell, a Sony, an HP laptop, a Blackberry phone? Then you bought a closed source product. What kind of a fundamentalist are you? I know I’m a terrible one, because, as much as I disagree with Apple’s corporate strategy, you can have my MacBook Air when you pry it from — strike that. You can have it when the newer, shinier one comes out. When that happens, I’ll be even happier if Apple takes a step in the direction of openness. Probably won’t happen, but, like the dog that goes happily to the front door when the doorbell rings even though it’s never for him, I am an idealist.

One dynamic that happens in a lot of idealist communities: we praise our opponents who make even a small step in our direction, but we attack our own mercilessly when they make even a small step away from us. It’s counter-productive.

Tom Igoe in defense of open-source innovation and polite disagreement – the most lucid, thoughtful take on the recent MakerBot controversy. 

( @blprnt)

Tagged: open sourcethought-provokingopen your mindAppleMakerbot

White lace minaudiere

White lace minaudiere

Tagged: minaudiereclutchwhie lacepale pinksilver

Source: monmondefou

cfda:

CFDA @vogue Fashion Fund winner for 2011 and 2012 new CFDA member Joseph @altuzarrastudio

I love his Fall/Winter 2012 RTW collection

cfda:

CFDA @vogue Fashion Fund winner for 2011 and 2012 new CFDA member Joseph @altuzarrastudio

I love his Fall/Winter 2012 RTW collection

Tagged: fashionVogue fashion fundAltuzarraCFDAFAll runway

Tagged: black and goldpersonal style blogfashion

explore-blog:


Whenever the subject of women in science comes up, there are people fiercely committed to the idea that sexism does not exist. They will point to everything and anything else to explain differences while becoming angry and condescending if you even suggest that discrimination could be a factor. But these people are wrong. This data shows they are wrong.

Despite what Einstein may have advised a girl looking to go into science, a new study demonstrates the persistent gender bias amongst science faculty, thwarting a truly equal opportunity.
As Scientific American’s Ilana Yurkiewicz puts it, “This is really important. This is really important.” Read it.

explore-blog:

Whenever the subject of women in science comes up, there are people fiercely committed to the idea that sexism does not exist. They will point to everything and anything else to explain differences while becoming angry and condescending if you even suggest that discrimination could be a factor. But these people are wrong. This data shows they are wrong.

Despite what Einstein may have advised a girl looking to go into science, a new study demonstrates the persistent gender bias amongst science faculty, thwarting a truly equal opportunity.

As Scientific American’s Ilana Yurkiewicz puts it, “This is really important. This is really important.” Read it.

Tagged: gender equalitysalarywomen in sciencesalary gapgender discrimination

kateoplis:

“WHEN Mitt Romney told the guests at a fund-raiser in Florida in May that America is divided between people who pay no income taxes and depend on government and pretty much everyone else, he missed the deeper truth. It is not just that most of the 47 percent Mr. Romney talked about do pay payroll taxes and that many of them have paid income taxes in the past. The reality he glossed over is that nearly all Americans have used government social policies at some point in their lives. The beneficiaries include the rich and the poor, Democrats and Republicans. Almost everyone is both a maker and a taker.
We have unique data from a 2008 national survey by the Cornell Survey Research Institute that asked Americans whether they had ever taken advantage of any of 21 social policies provided by the federal government, from student loans to Medicare. These policies do not include government activity that benefits everyone — national defense, the interstate highway system, food safety regulations — but only tangible benefits that accrue to specific households. The survey asked about people’s policy usage throughout their lives, not just at a moment in time, and it included questions about social policies embedded in the tax code, which are usually overlooked.
What the data reveal is striking: nearly all Americans — 96 percent — have relied on the federal government to assist them. Young adults, who are not yet eligible for many policies, account for most of the remaining 4 percent.”
We Are the 96 Percent | NYT

kateoplis:

WHEN Mitt Romney told the guests at a fund-raiser in Florida in May that America is divided between people who pay no income taxes and depend on government and pretty much everyone else, he missed the deeper truth. It is not just that most of the 47 percent Mr. Romney talked about do pay payroll taxes and that many of them have paid income taxes in the past. The reality he glossed over is that nearly all Americans have used government social policies at some point in their lives. The beneficiaries include the rich and the poor, Democrats and Republicans. Almost everyone is both a maker and a taker.

We have unique data from a 2008 national survey by the Cornell Survey Research Institute that asked Americans whether they had ever taken advantage of any of 21 social policies provided by the federal government, from student loans to Medicare. These policies do not include government activity that benefits everyone — national defense, the interstate highway system, food safety regulations — but only tangible benefits that accrue to specific households. The survey asked about people’s policy usage throughout their lives, not just at a moment in time, and it included questions about social policies embedded in the tax code, which are usually overlooked.

What the data reveal is striking: nearly all Americans — 96 percent — have relied on the federal government to assist them. Young adults, who are not yet eligible for many policies, account for most of the remaining 4 percent.

We Are the 96 Percent | NYT

Tagged: governmentpoliticsrepublicanswelfare

zaczkiewicz:

hautekills:

Mary Katrantzou s/s 2013

Australian Chrystal Chopland 

zaczkiewicz:

hautekills:

Mary Katrantzou s/s 2013

Australian Chrystal Chopland 

Tagged: katratzou SS13black and white gownSS13

Source: hautekills